Ping-Probe


Table of Contents

1. Features
2. Requirements
3. Overview
4. Credits
5. Install and Uninstall
6. Ping
7. TraceRoute
8. TCP Port Scan
9. Network Scanner
10. SNMP Browsing
11. Bandwidth Monitor
12. DNS Query
13. Finger
14. Whois
15. LDAP
16. FAQ's
17. License Activation
Index

List of Figures

3.1. Tool Selector
3.2. Results Window
3.3. Connection
3.4. Shortcuts
6.1. Ping
7.1. TraceRoute
8.1. TCP Port Scan
9.1. Network Scanner
10.1. SNMP Browser
10.2. SNMP Browser
11.1. Bandwidth Monitor
11.2. Bandwidth Distribution Pie Chart
12.1. DNS Query
14.1. Whois
15.1. LDAP
17.1. License

List of Tables

6.1. Advanced Ping Properties
7.1. Advanced Traceroute Properties
8.1. Advanced TCP Port Scanner Properties
9.1. Advanced Network Scanner Properties
10.1. Advanced SNMP Properties
11.1. Advanced Bandwidth Monitor Properties
12.1. Advanced DNS Properties
13.1. Advanced Finger Properties
14.1. Advanced Whois Properties
15.1. Advanced LDAP Properties

Chapter 1. Features

Ping-Probe offers ten high performance networking tools:
  • Ping (IPv6 Support)
  • Traceroute (IPv6 support and TCP Half Open Port method)
  • TCP Port Scan
  • Network Scanner
  • SNMP Browser (now supporting V3 and IPv6)
  • Bandwidth Monitor (shows traffic on an interface)
  • DNS
  • Finger
  • Whois
  • LDAP

To get accurate results, maps and location data are all stored locally. This enables fast results that are not squewed by internet traffic querying online maps and location data. Some of the tools offer IPv6 support.

Chapter 2. Requirements

Ping-Probe will work on any of the following Operating Systems:

  • Windows XP Home/Pro
  • Windows 2003 Server
  • Windows 2008 Server
  • Windows Vista
  • Windows 7
  • Windows 8.x

Chapter 3. Overview

Ping-Probe offers a comprehensive suite of networking tools. Each of the tools offers a modern interface and high performance, flexible functionality. When the program is first launched a Tool Selector is shown:

Figure 3.1. Tool Selector

Tool Selector

The window is devided into three parts. The main portion shows the results.

Figure 3.2. Results Window

Results Window

On the right there is the connection plane. This is where the parameters of the tools are set and the tool is run. The Go button starts the tool. The bookmark button adds a bookmark to the plane below and the reset to defaults button resets the the parameters to the defaults. The space above the buttons and below the list gives a description of the parameter when you have clicked on it. The dockable plane below the connection plane offers shortcuts, either bookmarks or history. Each time a tool is run it's added to the history. 50 items are stored. When you bookmark a connection it's added to the bookmark section of the shortcuts list.

Figure 3.3. Connection

Connection

Figure 3.4. Shortcuts

Shortcuts

The Ping and Traceroute tools show the results with a list followed by two graphs and a map. The graphs show details of the results and the question mark in the bottom of them will show a legend. The maps show the location of the IP's. Most of the other tools show results in a tree type list. Nodes of the tree can be expanded and contracted by clicking on the +/- next to them. The individual node, the displayed tree or the entire tree can be copied to the clipboard in text format then can be pasted into an email etc.

In most cases the root of the tree represents the query itself. In this case you will be able to stop the tool by selecting the root and clicking on the stop button, found on the toolbar and in the menubar under Edit. Queries that have been stopped or completed can be deleted. Once again if the root of the query is selected, the option to delete is offered through the menu and toolbar. The Delete, Stop, Expand, Collapse and Copy (copies the entire branch from the point selected) are available through the right click menu. The 'Clear Complete' button found on the menubar and the toolbar allow all items in the results that have been completed to be deleted.

Wherever possible graphic items will help make the results shown simple and intuitive to understand. The Bandwidth monitor, for example, will show a pie chart as well as the data obtained. Traceroute and Ping shows graphs and maps. Ping and Traceroute also offer an import feature allowing lists of hosts to be processed effortlessly.

There are a number of methods by which a tool can be opened. The toolbar offers a drop down menu with a list of tools, there is a dedicated menu bar and there are options under the File menu item (New). The dedicated menu bar can be set to Large, Small and Off state. These options can be found under the View->New Toolbar options on the menubar.

Chapter 4. Credits

None of the list below will offer ANY assistance with Ping-Probe. Please do not ask them how to use ping-probe or why something is not working. For that use support@ping-probe.com. Many thanks to:

www.IP2location.com offered the database and library to read the database that enables ping-probe to guess the location of an IP fairly accurately. Their database is stored in the data directory where it's application was installed. You can update this file from time to time if you want the most accurate results by downloading an updated file from their site. Please note you need the '.bin' file type, and it should the type 5.

www.WinPCap.com for making it possible for Ping-Probe to perform the almost impossible.

And Mapnik for the maps.

Chapter 5. Install and Uninstall

To install Ping-Probe download the PingProbe-Setup.msi file from www.ping-probe.com. Double click on the file to start the install. The installation wizard will then guide you through the install. Once complete, the option to have the program started automatically is offered. A shortcut to the program and the manual will be added to the Start Windows menu.

When you start the program is will ask if you want to install WinPCap, if it has not been installed. It allows Ping Probe to do some fancy foot work Windows operating system's are normally not capable of. This is used to do the TCP port scan and the TCP Half Open traceroute method. Network admins often block pings to prevent traceroutes from revealing their internal layout. This traceroute method can often reveal the route even with the blocks.

To uninstall you can re-run the installation program. The option to Remove is offered. Alternatively you can go to the Windows Control Panel and select 'Add Remove Programs'. In the list of programs Ping-Probe will be found. A button on the right will uninstall the program.

Chapter 6. Ping

Figure 6.1. Ping

Ping

When a device is pinged a small fragment of data is sent to the device. The device in turn sends the data back. Almost all IP based devices will respond to a ping, network admins however sometimes block them. The amount of time taken for the reply from the request to be received back by the sender is called the RTT (Round Trip Time). This is an indication that the device is functioning and the connectivity from the computer doing the request to that of the device answering the request is functioning. There can be reasons other than device failure or connectivity failure for a reply from a ping not to be received, the most common of these would be a firewall of some type in place between the requesting computer and the device being pinged.

Lists of hosts to run a Traceroute can be imported from a text file. Each row in the file should contain the name of the host to ping. Any number of lines can be present.

Table 6.1. Advanced Ping Properties

DelayTCP-IP v4 and TCP-IP v6 can be selected.
DurationHow long to run the test.
DelayThe amount of time waited, in seconds, between each ping request sent. The RTT is usually shown in three values, the Average, the Max and the Min. If only one request is sent then the Average, Max and Min will all be the same, so as a general rule more than one ping is sent so a better idea of the effective RTT is calculated over a short period of time, and not only at one instance in time. The number of requests that will be sent on a non-continuous ping is set by the 'Attempts' option. The Delay is the amount of time between each ping request.
TimeoutHow long to wait, in seconds, before assuming the request has failed.
TTL (Time to Live)As the pocket of data sent along the network goes through a router, the TTL value contained within the pocket is reduced by one every time. Once the TTL reaches zero the router will no longer attempt to forward the pocket on to its destination, but rather abort the attempt and reply to the sender saying TTL expired. If not for the TTL feature in TCP pockets, then a ping request on a bad network could bounce around a network forever.
TOS (Type of Service)This defines a flag within the pocket specifying the type of service of the pocket.
Request SizeThis is the size of the pocket of data sent.
FragmentWhether or not to allow the pocket to be broken up along the way to its destination.
Show GraphsWhether to show the graph.
Show MapWhether to show the map

You can right click on the host name to get a list of options, ie to rerun, delete etc.

The graphs have a question mark button on the bottom left hand side that will show a legend for the graph. The left graph shows Round trip times over time and the right shows the number of pings sent vs the number of pings received over time. The green line shows results from the first public host. This shows the results that it took to reach past your computer and perhaps your network and a little way into your ISP. This shows you quickly if the delay is on your side or the far side. When Ping Probe starts it will attempt to find the first pulbic IP and use that as the point for the green line. The red is the results from the host specified.

The map shows the approximate location of the destination, the red marker, and the green marker the approximate location of the first public ip, ie your location. The locations accuraccy is about 75% wrt to the city and 90% wrt the country.

The map shows some info in the right hand corner. The one bit thats not obvious is the minimum possible time. This is how long it would take for light to travel the distance between the estimated start location of the start and end. It is not possible for the response to be lower that the given figure. Router delays are not included and a straight line distance is assumed.

Lists of hosts to run a ping on can be imported from a text file. Each row in the file should contain the name of the host to ping. Any number of lines can be present. Go 'Edit'->'Import Host List' from the menu. Put each host on a new line in a text file.

Chapter 7. TraceRoute

Figure 7.1. TraceRoute

TraceRoute

The traceroute tool attempts to show you the route a request takes through the internet to get to its destination. Two methods of doing this are supported. The normal method of using pings, icmps, and the very modern method of using half open tcp ports (port 80). This second method is a lot harder for network admins to block as they would effectivly have to block web access. The half open bit means it does not actually open the port, the web service (if there is one) on the destination host does not even know the request has happened. The first stage in in establishing a TCP connection is used but the connection is never established.

Table 7.1. Advanced Traceroute Properties

TypeSelect the type of method used in the trace. Traditionally the ICMP methods were used. The more modern 'Half Open' method is also used. Depending on the situation either may work better than the other TCP-IP v6 is support with the icmp method.
DeviceThe half open method needs to know which interface to use. Select one from the drop down list.
DurationHow long to run the test for.
DelayThe amount of time waited, in seconds, between each ping request sent. The RTT is usually shown in three values, the Average, the Max and the Min. If only one request is sent then the Average, Max and Min will all be the same, so as a general rule more than one ping is sent so a better idea of the effective RTT is calculated over a short period on time, and not only at one instance in time. The number of requests that will be sent on a non-continuous ping is set by the 'Attempts' option. The Delay is the amount of time between each ping request.
TimeoutHow long to wait, in seconds, before assuming the request has failed.
TTL (Time to Live)As the pocket of data sent along the network goes through a router, the TTL value contained within the pocket is reduced by one every time. Once the TTL reaches zero the router will no longer attempt to forward the pocket on to its destination, but rather abort the attempt and reply to the sender saying TTL expired. If not for the TTL feature in TCP pockets, then a ping request on a bad network could bounce around a network forever.
Request SizeThis is the size of the pocket of data sent.
Show GraphsWhether to show the graph.
Show MapWhether to show the map

The left graph shows the Round Trip time and the right the delays of each hop on the trip. Once again the question mark button will show a legend. The map shows the physical route the data travels between the two hosts.

The map shows some info in the right hand corner. The one bit thats not obvious is the minimum possible time. This is how long it would take for light to travel the distance between the estimated start location of the start and end. It is not possible for the response to be lower that the given figure.

Lists of hosts to run a traceroute on can be imported from a text file. Each row in the file should contain the name of the host to ping. Any number of lines can be present. Go 'Edit'->'Import Host List' from the menu. Put each host on a new line in a text file.

You will need WinPCap installed in order to use the 'Half Open' method. ICMP methods do not require it.

Chapter 8. TCP Port Scan

Figure 8.1. TCP Port Scan

TCP Port Scan

The TCP Port Scan tool allows for TCP ports to be scanned to see if they are in use. This can only be done to a networked device. If the functions of a server are well defined, then the administrator will be able to justify the existence of each and every open port. An external tool is the best method to determine that no additional ports are active. This would indicate that unnecessary services are running, and therefor there is unnecessary additional risk of an external exploit being used against the host. The presence of unexplainable ports may indicate that the system has been compromised to some extent.

To use the tool, enter the host, select the IP address that you wish to send requests from (they must be an IP configured for your computer), select the range and click on the Go button. The scanner makes use of 'Half Open' port technique to obtain the fastest results. You should ONLY scan systems that are under your administration or for which you have explicit permission to scan. Administrators take a grim view to others scanning their systems.

The advanced options include a Delay (in milliseconds) and a Timeout (in Seconds). The Delay defines the time waited between each pocket sent. Without a delay your system will become very sluggish during the scan. The Time-Out defines how long the system will wait for a response, before deciding that no response will be received.

During a scan a progress bar is shown next to the query. Any ports found are shown along with the name of the port. The name is obtained from RFC1700. If you wish to alter the names or add additional then edit the RFC1700.txt with any text editor.

Table 8.1. Advanced TCP Port Scanner Properties

DelayThe amount of time waited, in milliseconds, between each attempt to open a port request sent.
TimeoutHow long to wait, in seconds, before assuming the request has failed and the port is not open.

Chapter 9. Network Scanner

Figure 9.1. Network Scanner

Network Scanner

This tool sends out ping requests to all IP's in a block range. Hosts that respond are displayed as 'child' outputs to the block request. Some of the parameters of the ping tools are available under the advanced options (see the documentation of the ping tool for more details).

It should be noted that this is not a port scanner, but rather an IP scanner, it tests for the presence of a device within a block range, not the presence of a port on a host. To use the function, enter the network address of the IP block and the Netmask. Then click the Go button. A progress bar will show how much of the block has been scanned. To stop a scan right click on the root branch and the option to stop is offered. Once stopped the item can be deleted. For each located host an attempt will be made to resolve it's IP. If a Fully Qualified Domain name is located it is shown next to the IP.

Table 9.1. Advanced Network Scanner Properties

DelayThe amount of time waited, in seconds, between each ping request sent (time in seconds between attempts).
TimeoutHow long to wait, in seconds, before assuming the request has failed.
TTL (Time to Live)As the pocket of data sent along the network goes through a router, the TTL value contained within the pocket is reduced by one every time. Once the TTL reaches zero the router will no longer attempt to forward the pocket on to its destination, but rather abort the attempt and reply to the sender saying TTL expired. If not for the TTL feature in TCP pockets, then a ping request on a bad network could bounce around a network forever.
Request SizeThis is the size of the pocket of data sent.
AttemptsThe number of pockets sent in a non-continuous ping.

Chapter 10. SNMP Browsing

This tool allows for the browsing of the output of a 'SNMP Walk'. There are some unique features that set the tool apart from all others.

Figure 10.1. SNMP Browser

SNMP Browser

To start the SNMP Browser two bits of information are required. The first is the Host name or IP address. This must be filled into the box next to Host. For snmpv2 queries, the Community you wish to query must also be entered. The Community can be thought of as a password for the SNMP server. If the Community entered does not match that specified on the SNMP server the server will not respond to the query. To you, the client, it would appear as though the host does not have a working SNMP service. The server can be setup to support a number of communities. Depending on which is used in the request, depends on the data given to the user. The most common community used is 'public'. To use SNMPv3 the community is not required but a lot of other info is, this will depend on how the server is setup. All the options for V3 are pressent and its fully supported. TCP-IP V4 an V6 are fully supported in this tool.

For each 'root' of the SNMP tree the output is first obtained and then 'cleaned', before it can be viewed. This cleaning optimizes (reduces to a minimum) the depth of the graphical layout of the MIB tree. This makes browsing a lot quicker, reducing the number of items that have to be 'opened' to get the end of the tree without compromising the data. A value for a MIB is only present right at the 'end' of a 'branch'.

Due to the way MIB trees are constructed, the need to expand lots of branches in order to get the information needed about one branch is often very inconvenient. To make the browser more useful, the use of what we have termed 'inference' has been incorporated.

Figure 10.2. SNMP Browser

SNMP Browser

In the screen capture above you can see that the end of the interfaces.iftable.ifentry.ifadminStatus.2 has been selected. All grayed values are inferred values and if not used in the context of the selected item are inaccurate. In other words the MIB interfaces.ifTable.IfEntry.IfDesc does not have a value of 'eth0' (in fact it has no value at all), but interfaces.ifTable.ifEntry.ifDesc.2 (inferred from .ifAdminStatus.2) does. So in the example, we wanted to know what the status of interface eth0 is, and in this case it was 1, which means operational. But unless you had also expanded .interfaces.ifTable.ifEntry.ifDesc you would not know that 'eth0' was referring to the .1 MIB extension. Although very difficult to explain in words, those used to a graphical SNMP browser will find 'inference' very useful and all should find it intuitive.

The SNMP Browser also has the ability to attempt to write to the server. Simply click on the value and enter what you desire. Note that the server will have to be setup to permit writing. If it has not been configured, then the server will most lightly not permit it.

Table 10.1. Advanced SNMP Properties

Enable Node Cleaning This feature reduces the number of branches to a minimum. Without this feature being enabled, the number of clicks required to get to the end of a tree branch may be a lot more.
Enable Inference Only the very ends of branches have values. Opening all the branches takes up a lot of screen space and/or time (click on all relevant nodes). Inference has been used to overcome these innate weaknesses in graphical SNMP browsers. This is done by showing values to branches that are not fully open, based on its relative position to the end branch that you have selected. Although a mouth full in words, it is extremely intuitive.
Inferred Cell Color Cells showing inferred values have this color as their background.
Enable Write If this feature is enabled then clicking on a cell will permit you to edit its value. A SNMP server will have to have been specifically setup to allow values to be changed, even if this is done not all values will be writable. The SNMP Browser cannot know whether writing is permitted until it makes the attempt to write the value. If the server does not permit the change an error message will be offered.
Timeout and Retries The timeout is the amount of time (in seconds) the SNMP Browser will wait for a response from the server before re-sending the request. Once the number of resend attempts reaches the Retries value, the program assumes no response will be forthcoming and report an error to the user.
Base This specifies the point in the tree from which the walk will start. To get the entire tree a start of .1.3 is often used. You could also limit the data by entering the part of the tree that you are interested in, i.e. system, would return all system MIB's.
Port The TCP port to send the requests to, usually 161.

Chapter 11. Bandwidth Monitor

Figure 11.1. Bandwidth Monitor

Bandwidth Monitor

Figure 11.2. Bandwidth Distribution Pie Chart

Bandwidth Distribution Pie Chart

This tool monitors the network through-traffic of any of the computer's network interfaces. A list of potential uses:

  • Identify if a computer has a virus

    Most viruses propagate through the network. Most often they make use of email systems to transfer the data, other times they will attack weaknesses in network ports. As an example, if your desktop computer is sending out mail, but you are not using any mailing software, you may be infected with a virus.

  • -identify if spyware is installed

    Spyware (often called Adware) leaks information about your computer or your computer related activities to someone on the internet without you being aware of it. This info can be, what websites you use, what music you listen to etc. It can also be password and banking information. If your computer is talking to outside computers for no reason, you may have spyware on your computer.

  • -Optimized network utilization

    Even with a simple desktop computer it is often difficult to answer the question, what is utilizing my bandwidth. When some server type software is installed the question becomes more difficult to deal with. The knowledge of which servers, and even which hosts, are consuming bandwidth can be very useful.

All traffic passing through the 'Bind' interface (one of the network IP address on your computer) will be categorized and counted. There are counters for each of the three protocols: ICMP, UDP and TCP. In addition the user is given the ability to count the traffic for any number of ports per protocol. There is no restriction on the number of ports. The amount of data received and sent is shown per protocol and also per selected port and protocol. The rate is also shown. This is the rate of change. Rates are calculated every 3 seconds.

Hosts can also be tracked. In this case not only is there a counter for each protocol, each specified port, but also all hosts communicating with the computer. The ability to hide hosts that have not communicated for a specified period is offered. You can also select to have the host resolved to their FQDN (this depends on reverse lookup being created by the IP's 'owner').

A Bandwidth Distribution Pie Chart window is created at the same time as the Bandwidth Monitor. This window will draw a pie chart of the bandwidth distribution. The pie chart has an outer circle that shows the distribution of the protocols (ICMP, UDP and TCP). The inner pie shows the distribution of the selected ports. A legend is shown on the right of the chart. Beneath the legend the ability to select either Totals or Rates if offered. Totals is the value of the counter since the tool was started. Rate is the current throughput per second. Rates are calculated every 3 seconds.

To start the tool, select the interface you wish to monitor (in the Bind dropdown box) then click on the Go button. The Bandwidth Distribution Pie Chart is opened with the Bandwidth Monitor window. This window can be closed if desired. To re-open it use the View menu option, and click on 'Distribution Pie Chart'. This option is also available on the toolbar.

Other options allow you to select to Track Hosts, have Tracked Hosts resolved to their FQDN and to have the host removed from the list if there has been no activity in the last x period (called 'Track Hosts for'). You can add a port to be tracked by right clicking on the 'Tracking Ports' item listed in the Connection Window. To Delete a tracked item right click on the title of the item. The Track Ports lists shows the ports being tracked. The Service is the 'common' name for the port and is obtained from RFC1700. If an item in the list is selected it can be deleted with the 'Del' button. Items are added by entering the port under 'Add Port' and selecting the protocol from 'Add Protocol', and then click on the 'Add' button for the item to be added to the list.

Table 11.1. Advanced Bandwidth Monitor Properties

Track HostsCount bytes sent and received for each host.
Resolve IPsFor the hosts that are being tracked attempt to resolve their IP address to FQDN.
Track Host ForAfter what period of inactivity should the host be hidden.
Track PortsA list of all ports that will have their own counters and entry in the result.
Add PortThe number of the port to add to the Tracking List.
Add ProtocolThe protocol of the new port you intend to track.
AddAdds the selected Port and Protocol to the Tracking Ports List
DelDeletes a selected Tracking port.

Chapter 12. DNS Query

Figure 12.1. DNS Query

DNS Query

The DNS Query tool offers the functionality of the command line programs like nslookup or dig. The main function of DNS is to offer a system where the IP Address (10.5.99.1) can be resolved to the Fully Qualified Domain Name (www.ping-probe.com).

To perform a basic lookup add the domain into the Query box (i.e. www.ping-probe.com). Select the type of record you wish to query, under type (for the www.ping-probe.com example you should select A). Click on the Go button and the results will be shown. Before you do this though you need to specify which DNS servers to query. Add the servers by right clicking on the 'DNS Servers' entry in the connection plane. To delete a server right click on the server you want to delete.

A big advantage with this tool is that the query can be made to multiple servers at the same time. This is often very useful. DNS administrators normally administer a primary DNS server and a number of DNS secondary servers. Often all servers are expected to give the same response. To test each and every server by hand can be tedious. It is often beneficial to query down stream servers to ensure changes have in fact propagated through the net.

Table 12.1. Advanced DNS Properties

ServersA list of servers that will be queried for each query.
ServerThe IP address of the server you wish to add.
AddOnce a Server IP has been entered, the Add button will add the server to the list.
DelA server selected in the Servers list can be deleted with this button

Chapter 13. Finger

The finger protocol offers information regarding who is currently logged onto the computer. If a user is not specified then the server responds with a list of users logged onto the box. If a user is specified then information regarding the user is offered, given that the user is active.

To use the tool, enter the server and the user (if desired) then click the Go button. Advanced options include the Time-Out in seconds. You can specify the port queried, which is usually 79. There is a Verbose option that will often offer additional information. The last advanced option is the Results Font. The RFC for this protocol implies that text art (the use of ascii characters to make pictures) should be supported. This can only be done with a fixed width font (font where all characters are the same width). Most default operating systems fonts are not. The default font for this is set to Courier, but the option to select any installed font is offered through a dropdown box.

Table 13.1. Advanced Finger Properties

Time-OutHow long, in seconds, to wait for a response from the server.
VerboseRequests extended information from the server.
PortThe port to send the request to, usually port 79.
Results FontThe font to use for the results. A fixed width font should be selected.

Chapter 14. Whois

Figure 14.1. Whois

Whois

The Whois protocol allows for some information about the owner of a domain to be obtained. There is no single server that has all this information. Each Top Level Domain (.com, .co.uk .org etc) is assigned at least one organization to provide domain name registrations. It is the organization's responsibility to create and offer the WHOIS database. The Whois protocol is often used to offer access to the public by this database. They may however opt to only offer information in some other format such as a web site.

The trick to successful use of this service is to know which server to query. Ping-Probe contains a list of 179 domains and the servers that offer info for them. So most of the work is done for you. If the domain is in the list the server will be selected for you, as long as the option 'Attempt to locate Server' is checked in the advanced options. If you wish to manually enter a server then unselect this option. To add or alter the server automatically selected from a domain edit the Whois.txt file located in the installed directory. You will need to restart the program for the change to take effect.

Other Advanced options include the Time-Out (in seconds) and the port. Whois usually uses the TCP port 43.

Table 14.1. Advanced Whois Properties

Attempt to Locate ServerUsed to select whether or not the program should attempt to lookup the server to query for the domain.
Time-OutHow long, in seconds, to wait for a response from the server.
PortThe port to send the request to, usually port 43.
Enable RequeryWith this enabled, if a response containing the text in the Marker is found, the text after the marker is taken to be a server and a second query to this new server will automatically be made. The query text for this new attempt will have a greenish background.
Requery Text MarkerText indicating what identifies a requery server. This is all the text up to the server on the new line. This includes spaces. Internic, for example, will respond with ' Whois Server: whois.someserver.somewhere'. So here the marker would be ' Whois Server:' with 3 spaces before the text.

Chapter 15. LDAP

Figure 15.1. LDAP

LDAP

This is a client for the LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol). Often used to store and deliver lists of data. An example would be a list of employees for an organization, and additional information about the employee. This is often used to create a shared directory.

To use the tool you will need to know the server and the Base Object. The Base could be something like 'o=xyz,c=us'. With this info click the Go button. If the entries are correct a list of the results will be shown. Other normal options include Scope (often left at 2) and the filter. The filter allows for the results to be limited based on some criteria.

Advanced options include the protocol Version to use, if in doubt select 3. The number of results to be displayed (No Results). The Port to be queried, the default here is 389. The Time-Out option is in seconds. The tool also supports servers that require authentication before access is offered. Click the Authenticate button if this is the case, and enter the Username and Password.

The results displayed have some unique features not offered in the other tools. If you right click on the header the option to hide (make the width zero) the columns is offered. The ability to drag columns is also offered, allowing them to be re-arranged.

Table 15.1. Advanced LDAP Properties

Use VersionThe version to use, when in doubt use 3.
No ResultsThe number of results to request.
PortThe port to query, usually 389.
Time-OutHow long to wait, in seconds, before assuming no response will be obtained.
AuthenticateWhether to send authentication info to the server.
UsernameIf authentication is selected, this is the username that will be sent.
PasswordIf authentication is selected, this is the password that will be sent.

Chapter 16. FAQ's

General

16.1. How do I add a MIB table to the program?

16.1.

How do I add a MIB table to the program?

Place the MIB file in the mib folder where you installed the program.

Chapter 17. License Activation

Ping-Probe is distributed over the internet as shareware. This means that a 10 day trial period is offered free of charge. When you open the program for the first time Ping-Probe will need to obtain a trial license. To do this access to the internet is required. All licenses are tied to a specific computer. This is done by creating a number that is unique to the computer and attaching the license to this number.

At the end of the Trial period the program will no longer allow itself to be used unless a Purchased License Code is entered. If you have used up your trial period then the License window will appear as the program starts. If you wish to purchase the product before the end of the trial period you will find the same window by clicking on License under the File menu.

Figure 17.1. License

License

A license can be purchased from www.Ping-Probe.com. You will be required to specify an email address and the Computer Identifier. The Computer Identifier can be copied and pasted from the License window. The link on the license window will open a webpage taking you to the www.Ping-Probe.com web site. Using this link your Identifier will be passed, automatically bypassing the need to copy and paste it.

Once the purchase has taken place you will be emailed the License Code to the Email Address you specified on the web site. The code and your email address will have to be entered on the License window in the License Capture section. Once a valid code has been entered the windows OK button will become enabled. It is recommended that you copy and paste the Code and the Email Address as they have to be exact.

[Note]Note
The Computer Identifier is a unique number belonging to your computer's hardware. If the hardware is changed the license may no longer be valid. You will have to request an updated License code from here
.

Index

License Code, License Activation

A

Attempt to Locate Server, Whois
Authentication, LDAP

B

Bandwidth, Bandwidth Monitor
Bandwidth Distribution Pie Chart, Bandwidth Monitor
Bandwidth Monitor, Bandwidth Monitor
Base, LDAP
Base Object, LDAP
Bind, TCP Port Scan, Bandwidth Monitor

C

Community, SNMP Browsing

D

Delay, Ping, TCP Port Scan
DNS, DNS Query
DNS Query, DNS Query
Duration, Ping

E

Enable Inference, SNMP Browsing
Enable Node Cleaning, SNMP Browsing
Enable Write, SNMP Browsing
End Port, TCP Port Scan

F

FAQ's, FAQ's
Features, Features
Filter, LDAP
Finger, Finger
Font, Finger
Fragment, Ping

I

Import Host List, Ping, TraceRoute
Inference, SNMP Browsing
Inferred Cell Color, SNMP Browsing
Install, Install and Uninstall
Installation, Install and Uninstall

L

LDAP, LDAP
Legand, Bandwidth Monitor
License, License Activation
Lightweight Directory Access Protocol, LDAP

M

MIB, SNMP Browsing
Minimum Possible Time, Ping, TraceRoute
Monitor, Bandwidth Monitor

N

Network Scanner, Network Scanner
No Results, LDAP

P

Ping, Ping
Port, SNMP Browsing, Finger, Whois, LDAP
Port Scan, TCP Port Scan
Public IP, Ping
Purchase, License Activation

R

Request Size, Ping
Requirements, Requirements
Resolve IPs, Bandwidth Monitor
Retries, SNMP Browsing
RFC1700, TCP Port Scan

S

Scope, LDAP
Settings, SNMP Browsing
Show Graph, Ping
Show Map, Ping
SNMP Browser, SNMP Browsing
SNMP Walk, SNMP Browsing
SpyWare Detection, Bandwidth Monitor
Start Port, TCP Port Scan

T

TCP Port Scan, TCP Port Scan
Time to Live, Ping
Time-Out, TCP Port Scan, Finger, Whois, LDAP
Timeout, Ping, SNMP Browsing
TOS, Ping
TraceRoute, TraceRoute
Track Hosts, Bandwidth Monitor
Tracking Port, Bandwidth Monitor
Trial, License Activation
TTL, Ping
Type, Ping
Type of Data, Bandwidth Monitor
Type of Service, Ping

U

Uninstall, Install and Uninstall
Use Version, LDAP
User, Finger

V

Verbose, Finger
Virus Detection, Bandwidth Monitor

W

Whois, Whois
WinPCap, TraceRoute